A silent Scolding

A Silent Scolding

The late John Wanamaker was the king of retail. One day while walking through his store in Philadelphia, he noticed a customer waiting for assistance. No one was paying the least bit of attention to her. Looking around, he saw his salespeople huddled together laughing and talking among themselves. Without a word, he quietly slipped behind the counter and waited on the customer himself. Then he quietly handed the purchase to the salespeople to be wrapped as he went on his way.

Later, Wanamaker was quoted as saying, “I learned thirty years ago that it is foolish to scold. I have enough trouble overcoming my own limitations without fretting over the fact that God has not seen fit to distribute evenly the gift of intelligence.”

Scolding, immediately, puts the one being scolded in the defensive and fosters nothing but resentment. In that mood your words can hurt his ego, but do not help to correct his mistake; whereas your example and sympathetic attitude may do the trick. Scolding only alienates, not reforms.

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